What is the difference between red oak and white oak hardwood?

Oak flooring is the most popular species of hardwood here in New England, and in most of the United States for that matter. Oak is a very practical hardwood flooring, is readily available (grown and made in the US), very affordable and very easy to stain, to give you the color effect you prefer. Many consumers don’t realize that there are 2 species of oak – red oak and white oak flooring.

If you are installing new hardwood flooring everywhere, either red oak hardwood or white oak hardwood will work, and your choice will probably be dependent on which look/color seems more appealing to you.

If you already have oak flooring, and are adding more material, you will want to match what you already have…that way, you will have a consistent look and wood will absorb the stain colors the same way. I’ve seen it happen too often where a customer (or contractor) has mismatched the wood with red oak in some areas and white oak in others. This means that your wood will never completely match – the graining will be different and the stain color will be different.
What’s the difference between red oak flooring and white oak flooring?

redoak-sel-btrWhite oak

Red Oak has a bit of a pinkish tint is a little bit lighter than white oak. White oak tends to be a bit browner, darker and more yellow. When you stain them, the difference between the 2 species decreases, especially the darker you go. With lighter stains, the red oak tends to have a bit of red undertone in the color.

2. Graining – Red oak has stronger graining than white oak. White oak has a bit of a smoother look. Some people prefer the strong graining of red oak.

3-Hardness – White oak flooring is a bit harder than red oak. On the Janka hardness scale, White oak is 1360 and red oak is 1290.

4. Compatibility with stair treads and accessories – Red oak is more common in stair treads, saddles, banisters and other transitions. If you have oak stair treads already in your home, chances are, they are red oak, so you may be better served matching that. If you need to get new stair treads or other transitions, they are usually more readily available (and hence lower priced) in red oak.

5. Price – In general, there is not a major price difference between red oak and white flooring. Because unfinished hardwood is a commodity item, the price tends to fluctuate weekly. At times, red oak costs more; at other times, white oak costs more. the price will often vary based on width and grade.

Please note that matching hardwood is a bit more complex than simply matching red oak vs. white oak. Also, there are differences in grades of hardwood flooring (e.g. select grade vs No 1 vs. No2 vs quartersawn). I will share this info in a future blog post. But, if you are unsure what type of flooring you have, it’s best to call in an hardwood flooring expert.

If you live in Massachussets