When you hear the term “hardwood plywood”, the first thing that you may think of is a flimsy board where you can see every bit of wood that was glued onto it while it starts to peel from the uppers because it was soaked for five seconds.

However, hardwood plywood is much, much, much sturdier than your everyday plywood. In fact, plywood itself is much sturdier than you may have thought originally! But the question is—where exactly does this come to mind? How do you know what plywood you should use?

First of all, you need to understand that plywood is made out of wood and glue. The process in which plywood is made, however, is a bit more complicated.

First, you start off with a log. The logs usually made into hardwood plywood are maple or oak. They are some of the hardest woods and are exclusively used in this type of plywood.

Next, the log is cut—but not in the old-fashioned way. Think of a Swiss Roll and how it is unpeeled. The log is cut in the exact same manner. Then, each of the pieces is laid flat and then glued together. Each piece is laid with the grain perpendicular the previous and next piece of wood, to make it stronger. They are then baked afterwards to harden the materials.

After that, they are shipped to your local hardware store or warehouses. The thing about hardwood plywood is that it is much harder than the flimsy board that you may have previously had in mind.

Hardwood plywood is good for a variety of things, including flooring. If you want to have good, sturdy flooring, using this type of plywood is a great idea.

However, you need to keep in mind that hardwood plywood doesn't ONLY need to be used for flooring—there are several other options!

For example:

You could use this type of plywood to build a little house or tree house for your kids! It's sturdy—so you can use it for both the walls and the flooring and the roof. It also doesn't warp as easily as regular wood, making it safer for your little ones.

Dog houses can also be constructed from this. If you want something sturdy and warm for Fido, you can use this type of plywood in order to create a deluxe (or maybe not so deluxe) doghouse.

You can also create a deck using your plywood.

However, remember that plywood is glued with formaldehyde glue. The concentrations are much lower at this point (formaldehyde is extremely carcinogenic), but you still want to make sure that if you decide to seal or otherwise protect your decks, floors, etc., that you do not use something that will mix and potentially cause splitting/peeling.

With this in mind, remember that hardwood plywood and moisture only mix for a certain period of time. If you intend on exposing it to a lot of moisture, then you would do better to search for marine plywood. It is more expensive, but may prove to be a better investment.

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Source: http://www.sooperarticles.com/home-improvement-articles/what-hardwood-plywood-181564.html

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What is the average pounds per square inch a common household floor can handle?
    Generally speaking, an average kitchen floor, 12′x15′, with wooden subfloor and joists, can hold how much weight per square inch, and how did you figure the answer? Thanks

    Second question: How many pounds per square inch can be held by a 3/4″x4″ oak or maple hardwood floor. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Floor load design depend on local code. In most locales, an interior residential floor is designed to support a dead load = 12 psf, and live load = 40 psf. This is about 0.28 psi.

      Hardware flooring is not designed to support any weight. It is installed tongue in groove and toe-nailed to a substrate to hold it in place.

  2. QUESTION:
    In Canada, where is a good place to get good looking cheap hardwood flooring!?
    I have an installer, but I need cheap flooring for him to put in. Looking for 3/4 inch thick, probably maple with a brownish finish.

    I have tried all the carpet places and such….anyone know of a good wholesaler or anything like that?

    I’m in Hamilton, and i’m looking for 400 square ft.

    • ANSWER:
      If you want to be bothered to drive here, there’s a really great place in Brampton called Brampton Flooring. It’s only a 40 minute drive from Hamilton.

  3. QUESTION:
    i dont get this math question? help?
    find the number that lies between these two numbers. 4/6,5/6

    explain why these fractions are equivalent fractions:
    3/5, 6,10,9/15,12/20

    in the U.S., hardwood flooring comes in different thicknesses. Maple, beech, or ****** is 25/32 inch thick. Both oak and pecan flooring comes in thickness of 3/8 inch, 25/32 inch, and 1/2 inch. Put these thicknesses in order, thickest first

    • ANSWER:
      1. Because you obviously can’t have 4.5/6 you have to change the fraction to an equivalent fraction. So 4/6 is the same as 8/12 and 5/6 is the same as 10/12. This means the answer is 9/12

      2. All the fractions a the same as they all divided into themselves. 3/5 is the same as 6/10 etc.

      3. 25/32, 1/2 , 3/8

      Just think of all fractions as a circle. 1 is the whole circle, 1/2 is 1 part of the circle when it is cut into 2,
      2/4 is 2 parts of a circle when it’s cut into 4, so exactly the same size, they’re quite easy really.

  4. QUESTION:
    math question? best answer?
    find the number that lies between these two numbers. 4/6,5/6

    explain why these fractions are equivalent fractions:
    3/5, 6,10,9/15,12/20

    in the U.S., hardwood flooring comes in different thicknesses. Maple, beech, or birtch is 25/32 inch thick. Both oak and pecan flooring comes in thickness of 3/8 inch, 25/32 inch, and 1/2 inch. Put these thicknesses in order, thickest first.

    • ANSWER:


3 4 inch hardwood maple flooring